How Big Does a Silverfish Get?

Silverfish are small insects that are often found in commercial buildings and in homes. They are not toxic to humans. However, their destructive feeding habits can cause property damage.

These wingless, slender insects are primarily attracted to damp or dark, warm, moist places. They feed on polysaccharides and starches, particularly in paper.

Adult silverfish can live for up to a year without food. Often, they are found buried in cracks or tucked into clothes. They can also hide in a pile of books.

The earliest known fossils of the silverfish species are from Tertiary amber. It is believed that they may be the first insect to colonize land.

During their life cycle, the silverfish molt several times. A mature adult may lay up to 50 eggs in a year.

Male and female silverfish have complex courtship behaviors. Before mating, the male taps the female with its antennae. This causes her to take the spermatophore into her ovipositor.

Females can lay up to 60 eggs at a time. Eggs are oval in shape and measure 0.8 mm in size. Most of the eggs are laid in clusters of about two to 20.

Silverfish develop a shiny, metallic appearance as they grow older. Depending on the type, they can live from 18 months to three years.

Typical adult body length is 10-14 mm, with or without antennae. When a nymph leaves the egg, it is only 2 mm in length. As it grows, the nymphs go through 14 stages of development.