How a Hot Air Balloon Flies

How a Hot Air Balloon Flies

Before attempting a hot air balloon flight, it’s important to know how the aircraft works. Hot air balloons have a burner which produces a flame, which fuels the air pressure in the balloon. The propane tanks are located in a basket attached beneath the envelope. The pilot and other crew members should wear safety goggles and heavy-duty gloves. Men should avoid polyester and nylon materials, and women should wear comfortable clothes that will not restrict their motion.

Winds in the air are variable, so the pilot must know the direction of the wind in order to control the direction of the balloon. Fortunately, hot air balloon pilots have the experience and knowledge to maximize the steering capabilities of their balloons. Although they can’t always land where they want, ground staff is always in close contact with pilots, and can help determine where the balloon should land.

A hot air balloon needs stable winds to give it better lift, and winds of less than seven miles per hour are the ideal conditions for flight. The pilots call the weather service before each flight to determine whether the conditions are ideal. A hot air balloon can’t fly in a storm because lightning is dangerous, and rain also reduces visibility. Furthermore, strong winds can destroy the balloon.

Whether a hot air balloon is landing in a city or a rural area, the pilot needs to choose a good landing site. It’s essential to find a location that’s easy to access from the air, is safe for passengers, and doesn’t infringe on private property or cause undue risk.