How Silverfish Are Made

Silverfish are wingless insects that are usually silver or pearl-gray in color. They are very small, usually weighing less than a quarter of an inch. These bugs are often found in basements and bathrooms. If they get into your home, they can cause a lot of damage.

Silverfish feed on starch-rich materials, including paper, wood, and cardboard. Their antennae are long and bristle-like. They are nocturnal, meaning they will not be seen during the day.

Silverfish will travel with their belongings. You can find them tucked away in cabinets, books, and other places in your home. They are also apt to travel with food. It is possible to catch silverfish by placing damp newspapers or dampened rags where you suspect they may be.

Silverfish like moist, dark areas. These areas can be found in bathrooms, basements, and kitchens. However, they will roam considerable distances in search of food.

The female will lay eggs in cracks and crevices around your home. She will lay a clutch of seven to twelve eggs at a time. Each egg will hatch in about two to four weeks. This gives them a lifespan of two to eight years.

Silverfish have a hard, waxy coating to keep water from evaporating from their body. Once they lose this coating, they will dehydrate.

As they grow older, silverfish molt several times. After their third molt, their scales begin to appear. While they have no wings, they have short thick legs that allow them to move quickly.