How Common is Rat Lungworm in Hawaii?

How Common is Rat Lungworm in Hawaii?

Rat lungworm is a rare disease, affecting only a small number of people. Most cases are mild and go away on their own, but the worm is still dangerous. Its symptoms include headache, stiff neck, fever, and tingling of the skin. It can be debilitating and can even lead to eosinophilic meningitis, which is the most serious form of the disease. The symptoms can last anywhere from a few days to a few weeks.

Rat lungworm can be contracted through a number of different ways. People who eat undercooked fresh fruit or vegetables are at risk for contracting rat lungworm. It can also be transmitted through slugs, which are often found in gardens and may carry rat lungworms to humans. While the disease is not widespread, it can be fatal if left untreated.

Most cases of rat lungworm in Hawaii have occurred on the Big Island. It has also been found on neighboring islands. However, the risk of infection is statewide, so people should still follow precautions and follow the recommendations to avoid infection. The symptoms of the disease can be debilitating for your rat, so it is important to know what to do and how to prevent it.

The rat lungworm is an infectious blight that has been found in thirty countries across five continents. The worm has been found in mammals, fish, and reptiles as intermediate and definitive hosts. It has also been found in humans, but cases in people have been rare.