Why Do Flies Slow Down Inside Their Bodies?

Why Do Flies Slow Down Inside Their Bodies?

Fly scientists have discovered that flies slow down inside their bodies to escape the risk of being swatted. This behavior is related to the way they perceive time. Flies experience time differently than humans do because of their size. Smaller animals have a higher metabolic rate, so time passes slower than for larger animals. In addition, researchers have found that flies’ eyes contain more mitochondria, which provide them with supercharged vision.

Flies are attracted to polarized light, which is why they are active during the day and become inactive at night. However, they are not comfortable with freezing temperatures, which slows down their body functions. At night, they seek refuge inside buildings to stay warm. Since they can sleep on almost any surface, they are often found in corners or around windows.

Similarly, flies react to sprays differently. When a droplet of liquid falls directly on a fly, it impacts its antenna at 7.70 m/s. Another droplet of the same size then hits the fly’s head at 0.48 m/s. This means that the fly is not responding to the threat before it comes in contact with the liquid.

Unlike most other pests, houseflies tend to thrive in warmer temperatures. They will hibernate in attics during cold weather, but will start becoming active again in the spring and summer. So, if you have houseflies in your home, you should take measures to eliminate them as soon as possible.