Why Can Flies and Bugs Fly in Cars?

Why Can Flies and Bugs Fly in Cars?

Flies can fly in cars because they move with the air molecules. When the windows are closed, the air molecules in a car move at the same speed as the car. When the windows are open, the wind inside the car causes the air molecules to travel at a different speed. When a car speeds up, the air molecules are moved in a forward direction. This causes the flies to hang in mid-air and fly around.

Bugs, on the other hand, can’t move with cars. Their wings are attached to an enclosed air packet, so they won’t notice the car moving at a constant speed. Likewise, they won’t be able to move forward to keep up with a car traveling at a fast speed, because the laws of relative motion would be broken.

The flies can be a problem inside the car if they don’t find food. They often enter a car thinking it is a good place to find water. But you can prevent them from landing on your car by spraying neem oil on the window. Cicadas, meanwhile, aren’t as big a problem inside a car as they are outside. However, if you do happen to hit a cicada, it will produce a sticky substance on your windshield. This is very difficult to remove with water alone.

Bugs that fly inside cars usually live on decaying food. Cockroaches and fruit flies are among the most common bugs in cars. If you have kids, pets, or a cluttered kitchen, the odds of these bugs being in your car are higher. Juice or other drinks spilled inside a car can cause bugs to settle.