Why Are Flies Important?

Why Are Flies Important?

Insects such as flies are important to the environment and our health. They are responsible for several public health concerns and are important disease vectors. Several species can transmit a variety of diseases by biting people and ingesting their excreta. Other species can carry diseases like tularemia by biting humans and spreading them to other parts of the world.

Flies are often associated with dirt and disease, but only a small percentage of species are harmful to humans. In fact, most flies are beneficial to the ecosystem. It has been estimated that there are over 100 000 different species of flies in the world, and their importance to our health is increasingly becoming apparent. This year has been declared the International Year of the Fly, which provides a great opportunity to explore the flies of our planet and to learn more about their diverse roles.

Studies have shown that flies provide a vital service to plants, and humans are now learning how to harness their beneficial qualities. Flies are often used as a lure for fishers and are a key food source for other insects. Flies are also important for agriculture. Their larvae feed on other insects, and their presence is necessary for the growth of many crops.

In addition to feeding on plant and animal matter, flies are important for the ecology of rivers. They can spread long distances and can move on weather fronts. This means that an area that is uninfested one day can be heavily infested the next. Some species are even capable of moving from Nebraska to Florida! Flies can be a nuisance because they can disturb recreational activities and transmit certain animal disease pathogens.