Do Flies Take Care of Their Babies?

Do Flies Take Care of Their Babies?

Do flies take care of their babies? The answer depends on the species. Some species, such as the tsetse fly, give live birth to their young. Others may lay hundreds of eggs, each of which will develop into an adult fly within a couple of days. This means that millions of flies can appear in a matter of days if there is enough food. Adult flies usually live about two weeks. Some species even produce live maggots.

The baby fly is usually small and white, about one-half inch in length. Most are wingless and have a translucent whitish color, like a tiny worm. Baby flies crawl about, seeking food and a place to pupate. They develop rapidly during the summer, from seven to fourteen days.

The life cycle of the house fly (Musca domestica Linnaeus) includes an egg, larva, pupa, and adult. The flies are important scavengers, but they are also dangerous to humans. They have the potential to transmit many diseases.

Infection with the larvae of fruit flies can lead to a disease known as myiasis. Infection with this parasite occurs in tropical and subtropical areas. Some species deposit their eggs near sores and wounds, while others attach eggs to mosquitoes and other flies. Once the eggs hatch, the parasite invades the body, where the baby flies will be infected.