What Conditions Can You Not Fly With?

What Conditions Can You Not Fly With?

There are certain medical conditions that will automatically exclude you from flying, including recent surgery or uncontrolled congestive heart failure. These diseases can cause serious health complications for other flyers, and you should avoid flying if you are suffering from any of them. Your doctor will advise you whether you can fly and what the risks are.

Pregnancy and recent surgery are also common reasons for not flying. Women who are more than 32 weeks pregnant or who are carrying twins are generally not allowed to fly. If you have recently had surgery on your eyes, stomach, or brain, you may also be barred from flying. Make sure to check with your doctor and the Civil Aviation Authority to determine your eligibility.

Certain infectious diseases also have limitations regarding your ability to fly. Influenza, for example, can affect you for up to five days after you first develop symptoms. Airlines may also want to avoid risking their workers’ health by flying with an ill passenger. Some airlines may also check passengers’ waiting rooms to make sure they aren’t contagious.

Another condition that prevents you from flying is deep vein thrombosis, or DVT. This condition occurs in deep leg veins and is caused by blood clotting. Getting a DVT while traveling is dangerous. It can lead to an embolism, which can be life-threatening if it travels through the blood stream. Fortunately, there are ways to prevent DVT while flying.