Why Do Fleas Bite Humans?

Why Do Fleas Bite Humans?

Fleas are blood-feeding parasites. They are not attracted to humans, but the human body system is different from fleas’, which is why people can react differently to flea bites. Here are a few things to consider if you have been bitten by a flea.

The first thing to remember about flea bites is that they appear in clusters. The marks are usually red and can measure up to three to four centimeters in diameter. In most cases, the bites do not cause skin blisters. However, delayed reactions can occur. Fleas may produce vesicles, which merge into a large vial known as a bull. The vesicles will turn red and will eventually disappear.

Fleas feed on blood throughout their life cycle. Female fleas consume blood more quickly than males and need this source of nutrition and energy to lay eggs. Fleas feed on blood from their host’s skin for three phases. The larvae will feed off fecal blood, while the adult fleas will suck blood from their host. Fleas do not eat humans, but they need blood for reproduction and mating.

Flea bites can be difficult to spot at first because they are small, red dots that are only a few millimeters in diameter. These bites are usually unnoticeable when fresh, but if you scratch them, you will notice that they are firm and red. If you do not treat flea bites immediately, the bites can result in swelling around the bite.